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If you have questions about NETL's Technology Transfer more information can be found here.
Title Date Posted Patent Information Sort descending Opportunity
Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures 6,908,497

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,908,497, titled "Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures."

Disclosed in this patent is a new low-cost carbon dioxide (CO2) sorbent that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. Researchers have developed a new method to prepare these sorbents by treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether in a way that either one comprises at least 50 weight percent of the sorbent. The sorbent captures compounds contained in gaseous fluids through chemisorptions and/or physisorption between layers of the substrate lattice. The polar amine liquids are located within these layers. This method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and provides absorption capabilities independent of the sorbent surface area, and can be regenerated.

Piezoelectric Axial Flow Microvalve 7,159,841

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,159,841 entitled "Piezoelectric Axial Flow Microvalve."

Disclosed in this patent are the design and functionality of NETL’s piezo-electrically operated microvalves and their use in fuel cell systems, which consist of an assembly of individual fuel cells into a stack. The microvalve improves flow control over the entire fuel cell system by integrating flow distribution and controlling of individual fuel cells within the stack. By controlling fuel flow in each individual cell, the microvalve system can prevent the overheating and under-performing of a portion of the stack, thereby avoiding reduced efficiency and energy output for the entire stack.

Lean Blowoff Detection Sensor 7,197,880

Research is currently inactive on the patented technology "Lean blowoff detection sensor," but the technology is available for licensing from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).
 

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents 7,288,136

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 titled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents."

Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO2) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO2 capture systems.

Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Moderate and High Temperature Gas Streams 7,314,847

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,314,847 titled "Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Moderate and High Temperature Gas Streams."

Disclosed in this patent is NETL’s process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams. The sorbent is made by homogeneously mixing a reactive substrate containing an alkali metal with an alkaline earth metal-containing moiety to form a mixture; adding water to the mixture; and drying the mixture. After drying, the sorbent is placed in a container permeable to a gas stream. The sorbents produced by this method absorb up to 38 times more gas than current methods.

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System 7,421,166

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 titled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System."

Disclosed in this patent is NETL’s laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. Laser spark generators then produce a high-peak-power laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has applications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

A Unique Split Laser System for Environmental Monitoring 7,421,166; 8,786,840; 8,934,511; 9,297,696; 9,548,585

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have developed a novel split laser system for in situ environmental monitoring via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) or Raman analysis.  The design features fiber-coupled, optically-pumped, passively Q-switched lasers that are small, portable, low cost and robust enough for even downhole applications.  The technology can be used in a wide array of applications, including, but not limited to, carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring for CO2 sequestration, oil and gas monitoring, and water analysis (groundwater and municipal systems).  The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with NETL.

Proof of concept experimentation has been completed. NETL researchers are continuing to design miniaturized lasers and optical delivery systems to allow further size and cost reductions. The researchers have identified the need to complete and demonstrate both single point and multipoint measurement prototypes.  The results would further validate the technology and expedite its deployment to the private sector. 

Heat Recirculating Cooler for Use in Fuel Gas Sulfur Removal 7,442,353

Research is currently inactive on the patented technology titled, "Heat Recirculating Cooler for Fluid Stream Pollutant Removal.” This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas 7,494,632

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,494,632 titled "Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas."

Disclosed in this patent is NETL’s system for the removal of elemental mercury (Hg) (and other contaminants) from flue gas streams, which involves utilizing a layer of sorbent particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag in a flue gas scrubbing system. Gases generated from combustion sources such as coal gasifiers, coal-fired electrical generating plants, and ore smelters are candidates, especially if the gases already need particulate removal, and if cross-contamination of fly ash by-product by sorbent/mercury is to be avoided. More than 90 percent of elemental mercury was shown to be removed when activated carbon particles were tested in this process. The particle-loaded membranes may also act as oxidizers of the elemental Hg ahead of wet scrubbers. In addition, cleanup of aqueous waste streams is possible.

Ionization Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor 7,523,673

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,523,673 titled "Ionization Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor."

Disclosed in this patent is NETL’s sensor system and process for multidirectional, real-time monitoring of the flow direction and velocity of a gas stream, with minimal pressure drop, such as air flow in a hybrid power generation system. The sensor comprises an ion source accompanied by a multidirectional ion collection device near the ion source. Possible applications include power generation and weather monitoring.