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Funding Opportunity Announcement
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected three projects to receive approximately $29.6 million for cost-shared research and development under Phase II of funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001450, Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE): Storage Complex Feasibility.  Projects chosen under this FOA will determine the feasibility for commercial-scale storage complexes that can hold 50+ million metric tons of carbon.
Institute for the Design of Advanced Energy Systems (IDAES)
Representatives from more than 15 energy-related companies from around the nation will learn about cutting-edge computational tools and approaches to help design and scale up new high-efficiency power plants, support existing plants, and improve resiliency at a workshop May 23 and 24 in Washington, DC sponsored by the Institute for Design of Advanced Energy Systems (IDAES) – a collaborative effort involving NETL, sister National Laboratories and key academic research institutions. IDAES consists of experts from NETL, Sandia and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Carnegie Mellon University and West Virginia University. Pooling skills and resources, the Institute is pioneering development of new computational tools that can be used to optimize the performance of power plants over a full range of operating conditions – both supporting the existing fleet and enabling the design and scale up of transformative advanced coal energy systems.
Kyle Rozman works with a crack sample in NETL’s load frame.
Because supercritical CO2 (sCO2) power cycles can improve thermal efficiency and enable energy production from domestic fossil fuels with responsible stewardship of the environment, NETL researchers are aggressively investigating how to maximize the service life of materials in sCO2environments. sCO2 power cycles operate similarly to other turbine cycles, but they use CO2 – rather than steam – as the working fluid in the turbomachinery.  In its supercritical state, CO2 remains liquid-like rather than gas-like and has unique properties for energy generation equipment. For example, turbomachinery that uses sCO2 can be very compact and highly efficient, requiring less compression and enabling better heat exchange. sCO2 power cycles operate at very high pressures, which means they operate more efficiently so more energy can be created from less fuel and with a reduced cost. Because sCO2power cycles require higher pressures than traditional power generation systems, the physics, chemistry, and components do not behave as they would in conventional systems.
Funding Opportunity Announcement
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has announced up to $13 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development (R&D) projects under the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001849, Novel Methods for Making Products from Carbon Dioxide or Coal. The Office of Fossil Energy seeks to develop novel, marketable products using carbon dioxide (CO2) or coal as a feedstock.  Projects are sought for technologies that show: a positive life-cycle analysis; the potential to generate a marketable product; and significant advantages when compared to traditional products.  The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects. There will be three areas of interest as follows: AOI 1: Lab-Scale CO2 Conversion
By Siemens - Siemens website, CC BY-SA 3.0
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) for input on the development of improvements in steam-based power cycles applicable to coal-fueled boilers. The objective of this RFI is to support DOE’s mission to lead research and technology development that promotes better steam turbine performance through advanced design and manufacturing techniques. This RFI seeks stakeholder input about research and development activities that could lead to performance improvements in steam based power cycles applicable to coal-fueled boilers. Specifically, DOE FE is interested in gathering information relevant to three technical areas:
Computational materials modeling enables alloy design on a microscopic level.
NETL researchers are continually finding innovative ways to improve the efficiencies of fossil energy based power generation, but the improvements generally come at a cost. Advanced fossil energy technologies, such as ultra-supercritical steam plants and oxyfuel combustion boilers, have the potential to increase efficiency and bolster clean coal efforts, since they operate at higher temperatures and pressures. However, this leads to harsher and more corrosive conditions compared to traditional power plants in use today. A supercritical steam boiler and turbine operate at very high pressure. As a result, the quantity of coal needed to create equivalent energy is less, resulting in less coal used per unit of energy generated, and therefore, less emissions. Meanwhile, oxyfuel combustion boilers burn fuel using pure oxygen instead of air as the primary oxidant. Because the nitrogen component of air is not heated, fuel consumption is reduced in oxyfuel combustion boilers making higher flame temperatures possible, improving efficiency.
The Partnership for Public Service has selected Barbara Kutchko as a finalist for the 2018 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals.
The Partnership for Public Service has selected Barbara Kutchko as a finalist for the 2018 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals. The partnership, which is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that believes good government starts with good people, states that Kutchko’s achievements are an eloquent testimony to the many ways civil servants make a difference for our country every day. The partnership formally introduced Kutchko, along with the other finalists, to agency leaders, members of Congress, supporters of the program, and the media at a tribute breakfast on Tuesday, May 8 in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. The Sammies, known as the “Oscars” of government service, are a highly respected honor with a vigorous selection process. The awards are named in honor of the Partnership for Public Service’s late founder who was inspired by President Kennedy’s call to serve in 1963. The awards align with his vision of a dynamic and innovative federal workforce that meets the needs of the American people.
Researchers at NETL have developed a variety of applications including power electronics
Advanced power magnetics research conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and its partners offers novel opportunities to boost efficiency, spur economic investment and reduce infrastructure as industry looks toward smaller, more efficient power technology capable of meeting the diverse demands of the modern world. Researchers at NETL have developed a variety of applications including power electronics, transformers and electrical machinery. Their work is highlighted in the special topic on “Recent Developments in the Processing of Advanced Magnetic Materials,” published in the May 2018 issue the Journal of Minerals, Metals and Materials. In this, they uncover the development of promising new soft magnetic materials and the application of advanced processing technologies for optimizing electromagnetic components.
Amid the heat, noise, and commotion in NETL’s alloy fabrication laboratory in Albany, Ore., researchers are experimenting with the design, development, manufacture, and testing of advanced heat-resistant alloys, superalloys and novel alloys
Increasing the efficiency of the way energy is produced in an array of facilities that dot America’s landscape is at the core of efforts to reduce the amount of fuel required to produce power, decrease harmful emissions, and eliminate waste. Increasing efficiency requires better processes and, especially, better pressure and temperature-withstanding materials for use in everything from the boilers that combust fuels to the power-making turbines that keep the nation warm in winter, cool in summer and keeps its lights on year-round. Amid the heat, noise, and commotion in NETL’s alloy fabrication laboratory in Albany, Ore., researchers are experimenting with the design, development, manufacture, and testing of advanced heat-resistant alloys, superalloys and novel alloys such as high-entropy alloys that can meet escalating efficiency improvement challenges and help create the next generation of energy industry hardware.
the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance (JMEP)
A research paper authored by two NETL experts that explains how a new computational algorithm was applied to alloy development to optimize heat treatments and increase consistency of mechanical properties in nickel superalloys and steel castings was selected as one of only five editor’s choice open access articles for 2017 by the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance(JMEP). JEMP is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published on behalf of ASM International that covers all aspects of materials engineering. The scope of the publication includes all substances used in engineering applications. Selection by the editors as a highlighted article reflects the comprehensive nature of the paper and its overall excellence.