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Svante Carbon Capture Technology using Rapid Cycle Thermal Swing Adsorption
NETL’s project partner Svante Inc. is rapidly scaling up a new sorbent and intensified process technology to capture carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas, from power generation and industrial point sources that could significantly lower the capital investment needed to develop carbon capture plants at gigaton scale. Svante offers companies in difficult-to-abate industries, such as those that produce cement, hydrogen, chemicals, pulp and paper, an engineered solution to rapidly capture CO2 with a unique filter made from nanomaterials called structured adsorbents. These filters are installed in a continuous rotary adsorption machine (RAM) that separates CO2 from flue gas streams and generates high-purity CO2 in about 60 seconds. Captured CO2 can then be stored permanently in the subsurface or reused as a feedstock for value-high chemicals and other applications.
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Learn about the latest developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program in this month’s edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter. The DOE/NETL Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements as compared to currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on the broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions across a wide spectrum of industries. Other focus areas include carbon-based power generation and negative emissions technologies such as direct capture of CO2 from the atmosphere and bioenergy with carbon capture. Information in this month’s edition includes:
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Request for Information Will Guide the Selection and Management of Critical Climate Investments of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law 
Carbon Capture Newsletter graphic
Learn about the latest developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program in this month’s edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter. The DOE/NETL Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements as compared to currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on the broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions across a wide spectrum of industries. Other focus areas include carbon-based power generation and negative emissions technologies such as direct capture of CO2 from the atmosphere and bioenergy with carbon capture. Information featured in this month’s edition includes:
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Today, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy and Carbon Management (FECM) announced its intent to fund cost-shared research and development to accelerate the wide-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR)—critical components to achieve the Biden-Harris Administration’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The potential projects will be selected under the DOE’s Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE) Initiative, which focuses on developing geologic storage sites with capacities to store at least 50 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2). Projects will be managed by FECM’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).
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Funding Addresses Urgent Need for Global Leadership and Collaboration on Deployment of Durable Carbon Dioxide Removal  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $14.5 million in available funding to leverage existing low-carbon energy to scale-up direct air capture (DAC) technology combined with reliable carbon storage. DAC, a carbon dioxide removal approach, is a process that separates carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air. The separated CO2 can then be safely and permanently stored deep underground or converted into products. DAC is considered a growing and necessary field that still requires significant investments to create a cost-effective and economically viable technology that can be deployed at scale in the commercial CO2 market. Advancing the deployment of DAC approaches is critical to combatting the current climate crisis and achieving net-zero emissions by 2050—a key priority for the Biden-Harris Administration.
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NETL presents the latest edition of its publication that showcases research on emerging energy technologies. NETL Edge shares the latest developments the Lab’s mission to drive innovation and deliver solutions for an environmentally sustainable and prosperous energy future. In this issue, we feature key research and technology development in decarbonization. Check out the newly released edition of NETL Edge to learn more about the Lab’s proposed Direct Air Capture Test Center, how NETL is supporting efforts to address regional worker shortages and climate simultaneously, and our work to develop efficient, cost-effective technologies to convert carbon dioxide into chemical building blocks, such as formic acid that can function as a liquid hydrogen carrier. See more here.
National Energy Technology Laboratory researchers Mac Gray and Chris Wilfong utilize sorbents to extract solubilized rare earth elements from aqueous solutions.
NETL researchers have adapted a sorbent technology initially developed for carbon capture applications to remove contaminants and critical minerals from water sources, advancing environmental justice and spurring economic revitalization in energy communities. The Lab’s Multi-functional Sorbent Technology (MUST) comprises a suite of versatile and low-cost, regenerable sorbent materials that look like fine grains of sand, but these tiny materials make a big impact by removing toxic elements such as lead and mercury, among others, from acidic mine drainage (AMD), preventing the effluent streams from polluting fragile ecosystems.  “We’ve already partnered with industry on projects working toward developing systems to treat AMD in the Appalachian region, including one in West Virginia,” said NETL researcher McMahan Gray, who led the team that developed the original material for carbon capture and adapted the technology for water treatment.
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Regional Initiatives Are Helping States Leverage the Environmental and Economic Benefits of CCUS, Delivering Good-Paying Local Jobs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $20 million in funding to four projects working to accelerate the regional deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The projects, representing all four corners of the country, are referred to as DOE’s Regional Initiatives to Accelerate CCUS Deployment—an initiative designed to identify and address regional storage and transportation challenges facing the commercial deployment of CCUS. Expanding the deployment of CCUS will reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources and is a crucial component to achieving the Biden-Harris Administration’s goal of net-zero emissions by 2050.
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Learn about the latest developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program in this month’s edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter. The DOE/NETL Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements as compared to currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on the broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions across a wide spectrum of industries. Other focus areas include carbon-based power generation and negative emissions technologies such as direct capture of CO2 from the atmosphere and bioenergy with carbon capture. Information featured in this month’s edition includes: