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Carbon Capture Newsletter
Learn about the latest developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program in this month’s edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter. The DOE/NETL Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements as compared to currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on a broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture, to reduce carbon emissions across a wide spectrum of industries. Other focus areas include carbon-based power generation and negative emissions technologies such as direct capture of CO2 from the atmosphere and bioenergy with carbon capture. Information in this month’s edition includes:
A photograph of various panels of a solar farm, with a bright blue, semi-cloudless sky in the background.
The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) comprise the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Net Zero Lab (NZL) pilot project ─ a $38 million initial investment announced today to advance new technologies and approaches for net-zero emissions and decarbonization that can be replicated in public and private facilities to benefit the entire nation. With each of the four national laboratories exercising its own unique capabilities and specialties, NZL will serve as an example to large domestic and multinational businesses with large emissions footprints by demonstrating how to adopt technologies and procedures that can lead to effective decarbonization. DOE plans for the NZL effort to expand to all 17 national labs in FY23. NETL Director Brian Anderson, Ph.D., joined DOE Secretary Jennifer Granholm and the directors of three other national laboratories to unveil the NZL pilot.
NETL NEWS
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $24.9 million in funding for six research and development projects to support the advancement of clean hydrogen for electricity generation. DOE will partner with private companies to research advanced technology solutions that could make hydrogen a more available and effective fuel for electricity generation.  This includes improving capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) associated with hydrogen production from carbon-based resources and technologies to more efficiently use hydrogen in gas turbines for electricity generation. The six industry-sponsored projects will fast-track the development of technologies that will improve the performance, reliability, and flexibility of existing and new hydrogen technologies. Electricity generated from clean hydrogen will help in reaching President Biden’s goal of having a zero-carbon American power sector by 2035.  
The Carbon Capture Newsletter logo
Read the latest edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter to learn about recent developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program. The Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements over currently available technologies.
A photo of white bubbles connected by thin white lines with various icons within the bubbles, all on a teal background.
NETL Director Brian Anderson, Ph.D., addressed participants of the virtual 2022 Spring Symposium of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Initiative (MITEI) Tuesday, May 10 and highlighted NETL’s ongoing contributions to building a sustainable energy future via hydrogen power generation and carbon capture. The symposium’s theme, “Hydrogen’s Role in a Decarbonized Energy System: How to Enable It,” explored the hydrogen markets, infrastructure, production and policies needed to achieve a future in which the needs of the economy are met by a hydrogen-based power sector ─ actions essential to meet the administration’s greenhouse gas emission reduction and net zero-carbon economy goals by 2050.
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Washington, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $14 million in funding for five front-end engineering design (FEED) studies that will leverage existing zero- or low-carbon energy to supply direct air capture (DAC) projects, combined with dedicated and reliable carbon storage. DAC is a process that separates carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air. When the separated CO2 is safely and permanently stored deep underground or converted to be used in value-added products like concrete, DAC is part of a carbon dioxide removal approach. The selected studies will advance the evaluation of DAC technology coupled to durable storage—both of which could play a critical role in conjunction with aggressive decarbonization in combatting the climate crisis and achieving the Biden-Harris Administration’s goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.
The April 2022 Carbon Capture Newsletter available now
Read the latest edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter to learn about recent developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program. The Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements over currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on a broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel-based power generation and industrial sources. The program is also developing a wide array of approaches to remove CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere, such as direct air capture with durable storage, biomass carbon removal and storage, and enhanced mineralization. Information in this month’s edition includes:
Image of module scale up
When NETL recently gave the green light for a private sector partner to build a large pilot scale field test of a technology that can effectively capture more greenhouse gases without using hazardous chemicals at a reduced cost, it represented the latest chapter in a technology development story that has been a dozen years in the making. Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) is a world leader in the development and production of membrane-based separation systems for the petrochemical, natural gas, and refining industries. MTR researchers have had a long working relationship with NETL experts on ideas and support to develop a cost-effective CO2 capture process that uses a new class of membrane material known as Polaris™. Membranes are thin layers of materials that are permeable to the molecules they are meant to capture, such as water, CO2 or oxygen.
Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ is one example of a technology developed with NETL oversight and support that’s been acquired by industry for commercial deployment.
Above: Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ is one example of a technology developed with NETL oversight and support that’s been acquired by industry for commercial deployment. Several innovative technologies developed with support, expertise and strategic guidance provided by NETL have been licensed for use in next-generation commercial applications to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from power and industrial plants to lower atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gas. “The licensing of these technologies is the result of decades’ worth of research and development to find science-based, cost-effective solutions to address climate change while sustaining the economic prosperity and equity of our domestic power and industrial sectors,” said José Figueroa, supervisor, NETL Carbon Capture Team.
Carbon Capture Newsletter graphic
Read the latest edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter to learn about recent developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program.  The Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements over currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on a broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel-based power generation and industrial sources. The program is also developing a wide array of approaches to remove CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere, such as direct air capture with durable storage, biomass carbon removal and storage, and enhanced mineralization. Information in this month’s edition includes: