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FOA logo
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and NETL have announced up to $6.0 million in federal funding for research and development (R&D) under the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001993, University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR). The FOA seeks to solicit and competitively award university-based R&D projects that address and resolve scientific challenges and applied engineering technology issues associated with the performance and efficiency of combustion turbines in fossil fuel power generation. Projects will support DOE’s University Turbine Systems Research program. This FOA focuses on five areas of interest (AOIs).
FOA announcement logo
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has issued a Notice of Intent (NOI) for a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for cost-shared research and development (R&D) projects for U.S. universities to conduct early-stage combustion turbine research. The objective of the FOA is to fund R&D that addresses and resolves scientific challenges and applied engineering technology issues associated with advancing the performance and efficiency of combustion turbines in combined cycle applications (e.g., integrated gasification combined cycle/natural gas combined cycle) in fossil fuel power generation. The FOA will seek to solicit and competitively award laboratory/bench-scale R&D in the following five technical topic areas:
NETL NEWS
Research conducted in NETL’s High Pressure Combustion Facility could someday enable lower consumer electricity bills. Unlocking Higher Efficiency Turbines Through Pressure Gain Combustion NETL’s ground-breaking research on a process to increase the efficiency of power-producing turbines is attracting research partners from some of the nation’s leading academic institutions as well as the U.S. Air Force, and the results could someday mean lower consumer electricity bills.
Turbines are essential in meeting America’s power demands, producing electricity at virtually every power plant in the United States.
Turbines are essential in meeting America’s power demands, producing electricity at virtually every power plant in the United States. With fossil fuels projected to remain the dominant source of energy for decades to come, advanced combustion turbine technology will play a critical role in capitalizing on the nation’s vast domestic resources. While many energy technologies are focused on one specific application, advanced combustion turbines offer versatility in their ability to be adapted for use in a variety of power systems – including those fueled by coal or natural gas, combined with pre- or post-combustion carbon capture. NETL’s work to improve advanced combustion turbines seeks to boost overall turbine efficiency, cut the cost of electricity, reduce pollutant emissions and enable more affordable carbon capture options.
By Siemens - Siemens website, CC BY-SA 3.0
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) for input on the development of improvements in steam-based power cycles applicable to coal-fueled boilers. The objective of this RFI is to support DOE’s mission to lead research and technology development that promotes better steam turbine performance through advanced design and manufacturing techniques. This RFI seeks stakeholder input about research and development activities that could lead to performance improvements in steam based power cycles applicable to coal-fueled boilers. Specifically, DOE FE is interested in gathering information relevant to three technical areas:
Funding Opportunity Announcement
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected 14 projects to receive approximately $7 million in federal funding under the funding opportunity announcement, DE-FOA-0001816, Advanced Components for 65 Percent Combined Cycle Efficiency, Super Critical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) Power Cycles and Advanced Modular Heat Engines. These cost-shared research and development projects will support the goals of The Office of Fossil Energy’s Advanced Energy Systems Program by developing advanced, highly efficient, turbine-based technologies for coal-derived synthesis gas, coal-derived hydrogen, and natural gas. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects, described below: Area of Interest 1: Advanced Combustion Turbines for Combined Cycle Applications
Turbine
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced up to $5.5 million in federally funded financial assistance for cost-shared research and development projects under the first phase of the Office of Fossil Energy’s funding opportunity announcement (FOA) Advanced Components for 65% Combined-Cycle Efficiency, SCO2 Power Cycles and Advanced Modular Hybrid Heat Engines. Selected projects will support DOE’s Advanced Coal and Power Systems goals by developing advanced, highly efficient, turbine-based technologies applicable to fossil fuels, including coal-derived synthesis gas, coal-derived hydrogen, and natural gas. The projects will be managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. The FOA focuses on three areas of interest (AOIs):
Turbine
The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected nine projects to receive $5.4 million in federal funding to support university-based fundamental turbine research. The new research projects were selected under the funding opportunity announcement University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR), which aims to address scientific challenges and applied engineering technology issues associated with advancing the performance and efficiency of gas turbines in combined cycle power generation applications.
Photos of researchers
Researchers and engineers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will join turbomachinery colleagues from around the world at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Turbo Expo, presented by the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute, to be held June 26–29, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. This international conference and exposition brings together thousands of experts each year to share the latest in turbine technology, research, development, and application. Two NETL researchers, chemical engineer Dr. Stephen E. Zitney and mechanical engineer Eric Liese, will pick up an award at Turbo Expo 2017. Their paper, “Dynamic Model of a 10 MW Supercritical CO2Recompression Brayton Cycle,” was presented at Turbo Expo 2016 in Seoul, South Korea, and was chosen as a Best Paper by the Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles Committee. The paper was co-authored by Drs. Fabio Lambruschini and Alberto Traverso from the Thermochemical Power Group at the University of Genoa, Italy.