Back to Top
Skip to main content
 
 
 
SRI International’s mixed salt process is seen here (bottom right) at engineering scale.
In the photo above: SRI International’s mixed salt process is seen here (bottom right) at engineering scale.  SRI International, with oversight from NETL, is developing a transformational carbon capture technology that leverages an advanced mixed-salt process (MSP) to reduce capture costs and provide a pathway toward the nation’s decarbonization goals.  “The technology SRI International and their partners are developing has the potential to significantly reduce the energy needed to regenerate the carbon capture solvent and compress the CO2 product, thereby reducing costs” said Krista Hill, NETL federal project manager for the project. Hill, a West Virginia native, earned her master’s in chemistry at the University of Oregon and then returned to her home state to join NETL’s carbon capture team in Morgantown. With a diverse background in materials research and development, project management, business development and STEM education, Hill is well-positioned to bring expertise and a unique perspective to the DOE-NETL mission. 
Carbon Capture Newsletter graphic
Check out the latest edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter to learn about recent developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program.  The DOE/NETL Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements as compared to currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on the broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel-based power generation and industrial sources. The Program is also developing a wide array of approaches to remove CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere, such as direct air capture with durable storage, biomass carbon removal and storage, and enhanced mineralization. Information in this month’s edition includes:
SLED/M provides a visualization of a methane leak at a compressor station
In the image above, SLED/M provides a visualization of a methane leak at a compressor station Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), with support from NETL, has concluded a five-year project resulting in the development of a novel methane leak detection technology that has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the energy sector.   Compressor stations are essential for moving natural gas in midstream applications, but these stations have been shown to significantly contribute to fugitive methane emissions, a greenhouse gas contributing to climate change. SwRI’s Smart Methane Emission Detection System (SLED/M) is a system that can reliably, accurately, and autonomously detect and estimate methane leaks in natural gas infrastructure in real time using midrange infrared (MWIR) optical gas imaging (OGI) cameras. The technology represents a significant improvement over existing methane detection systems, which have significantly lower estimation capabilities. 
#NETL researchers, working closely with experts at @energygov Office of the Chief Information Officer have designed a multi-cloud-based computational solution to complement on-site resources that will accelerate #CleanEnergy research across the agency.
NETL researchers, working closely with experts at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO), have designed a multi-cloud-based computational solution to complement on-site resources that will accelerate clean energy research across the agency.  The team then tested the cloud environment using the powerful NETL-developed deep-learning tool SmartSearch©, which helps to mitigate one of the biggest draws on a researcher’s time — searching for, acquiring, and transforming relevant data. 
NETL researchers are pursuing an all-hands-on-deck effort to determine hydrogen production’s current state-of-the-art and what is needed to reach the low-cost, net-zero emissions goals of the #EarthShot Initiative
NETL’s Strategic Systems Analysis & Engineering (SSAE) researchers and analysts are pursuing an all-hands-on-deck effort to realize a clean energy future by harnessing the nation’s fossil energy resources to produce hydrogen sustainably through the use of commercial and advanced hydrogen production and carbon dioxide capture technologies. Fossil fuel-derived hydrogen (H2) presents new opportunities to decarbonize challenging sectors of the economy, such as transportation and decentralized, distributed industrial applications. In June, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an aggressive crosscutting initiative for hydrogen production called the Hydrogen Energy EarthShot with the goal of reducing the cost of clean hydrogen production to $1/kg H2 by the year 2030. This initiative supports the Biden-Harris Administration’s goal of a net-zero carbon emissions economy by 2050 while creating good-paying union jobs and growing the economy. 
RWFI E-note Monthly
The January 2022 edition of the RWFI E-Note Monthly, the newsletter of NETL’s Regional Workforce Initiative (RWFI), will include invitations for an upcoming webinar on the job-creating potential of hydrogen power. During the Energy 101 Webinar on Hydrogen and the Low-Carbon Economy, attendees will learn about the research being conducted by NETL in hydrogen technologies and how successes in research may lead to economic and workforce opportunities. The Biden Administration strives to create a clean energy sector, which can be achieved through a combination of hydrogen production from the country’s energy resources while simultaneously capturing and storing carbon dioxide. This approach holds great potential for workforce development. Attendance to the Energy 101 series is free, but spaces are limited. Interested parties are asked to register in advance for the event.
This image shows a modular container unit with Polaris membrane stacks. The CEMEX project will have multiple containers.  Credit: Image provided by Membrane Technology & Research Inc.
The image above shows a modular container unit with Polaris membrane stacks. The CEMEX project will have multiple containers. Credit: Image provided by Membrane Technology & Research Inc.   NETL’s industry partners are evaluating the use of a transformational membrane technology to capture greenhouse gas produced during the manufacturing of cement and lower the environmental footprint for this important building and construction material. “The project being developed with our industrial partners at the CEMEX Balcones facility in New Braunfels, Texas, is generating an initial engineering design and constructability review to determine if the application of an advanced industrial membrane capture technology at a cement plant is feasible,” said NETL’s Carl Laird, federal project manager.
Phil Reppert training at RAX Run Eventing in Northern Virginia with Gory, a Hanoverian horse.
Above: Phil Reppert training at RAX Run Eventing in Northern Virginia with Glory’s Gold, a Hanoverian horse. In addition to his work as NETL’s Associate Director for Geological and Environmental Systems, Philip Reppert, Ph.D., has demonstrated a profound talent for horsemanship and storytelling, recently combining these two passions into writing projects, including a family-friendly novel with a message of hope during the holiday season.  Growing up in Shillington, Pennsylvania, Reppert comes from a family where medical and STEM careers were predominant, which inspired him to pursue a career in science. He earned his bachelor of science degree in engineering from Penn State University, and after working in industry for several years, he went back to school and eventually earned a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Reppert started working for the federal government at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Reppert later moved back to Pennsylvania to be closer to family, which took him to the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency where he worked for seven years before joining NETL.
SSAE Newsletter
The January 2022 edition of the SSAE Newsletter provides updates about recent research initiatives undertaken within NETL’s Strategic Systems Analysis and Engineering (SSAE) directorate. Click here to access this latest edition and learn about activities that SSAE is leading to gain insights into new energy concepts, support the analysis of energy system interactions and advance its capabilities. Highlights in this edition include:
The Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, along with the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and Geothermal Technologies Office
The Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) at the University of Utah and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy’s (EERE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) have partnered with NETL to explore enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) via the Utah FORGE project. Once optimized and developed, electricity from EGS could power tens of millions of American homes and businesses. Geothermal resources occur where water circulates through a network of interconnected fractures, or pathways, within naturally hot rocks found deep below the planet’s surface. Operators can then produce power from the hot water once it is brought to the surface by deep underground wells. However, not all of these resources are conducive for power generation. Some don’t contain enough water to extract the heat, while others contain too few pathways to circulate the water. In an effort to solve the latter challenge, operators can inject fluid into the hot rocks, create pathways, and extract the heat resource from a new, manmade geothermal reservoir.