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NETL tool is being used to monitor the Great Pacific Garbage Patch for cleanup activities.
Above: NETL tool is being used to monitor the Great Pacific Garbage Patch for cleanup activities. A digital tool developed by NETL that helps examine ocean currents and wind patterns to predict where oil and other particles in the ocean are likely to travel in the event of an oil spill is being used for a range of non-energy related uses - like keeping track of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch for cleanup activities. NETL’s Kelly Rose, Ph.D. explained that the Climatological and Instantaneous Isolation and Attraction Model (CIIAM) was developed within NETL’s Advanced Offshore Research portfolio (AOR) as one of several projects initiated because of lessons learned following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. That event highlighted the need for improved models, data, and tools to prevent future events, and improve response preparedness. 
Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ is one example of a technology developed with NETL oversight and support that’s been acquired by industry for commercial deployment.
Above: Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ is one example of a technology developed with NETL oversight and support that’s been acquired by industry for commercial deployment. Several innovative technologies developed with support, expertise and strategic guidance provided by NETL have been licensed for use in next-generation commercial applications to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from power and industrial plants to lower atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gas. “The licensing of these technologies is the result of decades’ worth of research and development to find science-based, cost-effective solutions to address climate change while sustaining the economic prosperity and equity of our domestic power and industrial sectors,” said José Figueroa, supervisor, NETL Carbon Capture Team.
SSAE Newsletter
The March 2022 edition of the SSAE Newsletter provides updates about recent research initiatives undertaken within NETL’s Strategic Systems Analysis and Engineering (SSAE) directorate. Click here to access this latest edition and learn about activities that SSAE is leading to gain insights into new energy concepts, support the analysis of energy system interactions and advance its capabilities. Highlights in this edition include:
Winners of the 2022 WPASB
North Allegheny Senior High School Team One and Marshall Middle School Team One, both from Wexford, claimed victory at the 31st annual Western Pa. Bowl (WPASB), held Feb. 26 and March 5, 2022, in a virtual setting. Forty-one teams from 27 high schools and 30 teams representing 17 middle schools throughout Western Pennsylvania participated in the competition, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).  The winners of the 2022 WPASB competition will represent Western Pennsylvania in DOE’s National Science Bowl scheduled for April 29-May 3 which will also be in a virtual format.  The WPASB tested students’ knowledge of math and science topics. High school teams competed Saturday, Feb. 26, followed by middle school students a week later. This year’s Science Bowl continued with the altered format that went in effect last year; teams competed individually instead of head-to-head with the highest scoring teams moving up. The final winning teams in the two events will compete in the National Science Bowl.
Example and screenshot of CORD datasets used within the “CORD Platform” dashboard web application. The map (top center) displays coal delivery pathways extending from mine (black squares) to power plants (blue triangles and light blue highlighted circles) associated with the Powder River (Basin) coal source region (purple area on map). Datasets are summarized around the map within charts, lists, and graphs accordingly.
Example and screenshot of CORD datasets used within the “CORD Platform” dashboard web application. The map (top center) displays coal delivery pathways extending from mine (black squares) to power plants (blue triangles and light blue highlighted circles) associated with the Powder River (Basin) coal source region (purple area on map). Datasets are summarized around the map within charts, lists, and graphs accordingly. NETL’s new Carbon Ore Resources Database (CORD) is a valuable online tool to enable the recovery of high-value carbons and critical minerals from U.S. mining and industrial waste streams needed to support innovative manufacturing while lowering the environmental footprint of using domestic resources. 
Carbon Capture Newsletter graphic
Read the latest edition of the Carbon Capture Newsletter to learn about recent developments in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NETL Carbon Capture Program.  The Carbon Capture Program is developing the next generation of advanced carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies that can provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy requirements over currently available technologies. The Carbon Capture Program focuses on a broad portfolio of projects, including post- and pre-combustion capture to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel-based power generation and industrial sources. The program is also developing a wide array of approaches to remove CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere, such as direct air capture with durable storage, biomass carbon removal and storage, and enhanced mineralization. Information in this month’s edition includes:
A new report by NETL confirms that it would be technically feasible to produce jet fuel at the Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT) by converting natural gas from wells on the property into liquid fuel using a commercially available technology — a step that could build upon the airport’s already successful grid independence initiatives, insulate the airport from fuel disruptions in the marketplace, and provide a path to reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
A new report by NETL confirms that it would be technically feasible to produce jet fuel at the Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT) by converting natural gas from wells on the property into liquid fuel using a commercially available technology — a step that could build upon the airport’s already successful grid independence initiatives, insulate the airport from fuel disruptions in the marketplace, and provide a path to reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The NETL conceptual study indicates that it is technically feasible to construct and operate a gas-to-liquids (GTL) facility on the property that could produce about 6,000 barrels per day (70 million gallons per year) of synthetic jet fuel. Availability of jet fuel in those volumes could supplant nearly all of current jet fuel consumption at PIT and have excess production capacity that could be made available for the United States Air Force (USAF) Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station and the USAF 171st Air Refueling Wing co-located at the airport. 
NETL-Supported REE from Coal Ash Technology Development Attracts New Support from DOD
U.S.  Department of Defense (DOD) progress on a $4 million plan to pursue a technology for recovering rare earth elements (REEs) and other critical minerals from coal ash, has its roots in a ground-breaking project spearheaded by NETL and private partner – Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). The DOD’s action is an example of how NETL leverages cooperative partnerships for technology development in the public and private sectors. PSI, with support from NETL, demonstrated a concept of how REE concentrates can be produced using coal ash resources from Appalachia. The goal of the project was to provide a potential domestic source of REEs along with a viable environmental remediation process for coal fly ash.  REEs are crucial for a variety of economic, energy and defense applications. The current supply chain is dominated by other countries. A domestic source would insulate the U.S. from disruptions in global trade of REEs. 
Large Power Transformer
GE Global Research (GEGR) in partnership with Cooperative Energy completed commissioning tests for a first-of-its-kind full-scale prototype large power transformer (LPT), a technology that can lead to greater grid resilience during power outages. This work is being performed under a cooperative agreement awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity’s Transformer Resilience and Advanced Components program (TRAC), which is managed by NETL.  Now fully operational as part of the power distribution system in Columbia, Mississippi, the Large Power Transformer (LPT), represents the world’s first variable impedance flexible design transformer in its class, rated at 60 megavolt amperes. This transformer’s variable impedance design advances a more flexible and adaptable LPT promoting greater standardization to increase grid resilience, such as faster recovery through greater interchangeability of components.
2021 Womens History Month
March is Women’s History Month, providing NETL with a prime opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women from across the Lab who are advancing research to mitigate climate change, discovering clean energy technologies and leading teams of research scientists and engineers as they contribute to the legacy of women who have served as pioneers in their fields. Throughout the month, NETL will feature some dedicated scientists and professionals and highlight the important roles they play in leading projects throughout the Lab. Watch for Women’s History Month posts on NETL social media. In addition to their accomplishments, those profiled will discuss the progress that has been made to ensure women are fairly and equally represented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. These talented individuals also will share how closing the gender gap in STEM careers builds diversity and inclusion, which are essential components to cultivate workplace environments where different viewpoints and perspectives are needed to find solutions to challenging issues.