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The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected seven projects to receive approximately $2.8 million in federal funding for research and development projects that support fossil energy research at colleges and universities nationwide, including minority institutions. Projects under this initiative educate the next generation of scientists and engineers and help advance innovative and fundamental research focused on coal-based, fossil energy resources. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMI) program aims to increase the participation of underrepresented students in such research. Selected through funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001842, Support of Fossil Energy Research at U.S. Colleges and Universities Including University Coal Research (UCR) and Research by Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions, the projects will minimize costs and requirements for energy treatment by optimizing power plant environmental controls; the projects will also boost efficiency by integrating robotics technologies.
NETL NEWS
NETL, the only U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory focused on development of advanced fossil energy technologies and the only government-owned and government-operated (GOGO) national laboratory, is playing a prominent part in DOE’s new Lab Partnering Service (LPS) Internet presence that offers technology investors and innovators multi-faceted search capabilities across a range of technology areas resident in the national laboratories.
NETL NEWS
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected five additional projects to receive approximately $11.3 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development. These projects are supported through the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001792, Novel and Enabling Carbon Capture Transformational Technologies. Selected projects will support DOE’s Carbon Capture Program, which is developing transformational, step-change, low-cost capture processes and enabling technologies that will maximize the efficiency of our nation's fossil-based power generation infrastructure. The selected projects will join six other projects under this FOA chosen by FE to receive approximately $17.6 million in February 2018. The National Energy Technology Laboratory will manage these additional projects, and descriptions follow.
NETL NEWS
In 1917, when Albert Einstein suggested that it might be possible, under the right conditions, to produce light rays that could be directed at atoms to produce energy in beams of light, he created the theory behind what would become light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation – what we call lasers today. Einstein never dreamed that researchers would someday use this principle to improve fossil fuel-based power generation systems – but that’s just what’s happening at NETL. NETL researchers are using lasers to make better sensors that work more efficiently inside the harsh environments of power generation systems, from traditional coal-fired power plants to solid oxide fuel cells, gas turbines, boilers, and oxy-fuel combustion.
NETL NEWS
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected five projects to receive approximately $6.4 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development projects. These projects will develop transformational technologies for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and purification, from lab scale through bench scale, for coal gasification facilities. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001830, Transformational Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies, supports these projects.
NETL NEWS
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected 15 projects to receive nearly $8.8 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development (R&D) projects to develop innovative technologies that enhance fossil energy power systems. The newly selected projects fall under DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy’s Crosscutting Technology Research Program, which advances technologies that have a broad range of fossil energy applications. Specifically, the program fosters innovative R&D in sensors and controls, modeling and simulation, high-performance materials, and water management. DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the selected projects, listed below, and are funded under two separate funding opportunity announcements (FOA).
NETL NEWS
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected 16 projects to receive approximately $13.5 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development (R&D) projects that will advance solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies.
NETL NEWS
Research conducted in NETL’s High Pressure Combustion Facility could someday enable lower consumer electricity bills. Unlocking Higher Efficiency Turbines Through Pressure Gain Combustion NETL’s ground-breaking research on a process to increase the efficiency of power-producing turbines is attracting research partners from some of the nation’s leading academic institutions as well as the U.S. Air Force, and the results could someday mean lower consumer electricity bills.
NETL NEWS
The Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking field work proposals (FWPs) from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Laboratory Complex. These FWPS will focus on identifying new concepts and technologies for producing oxygen via air separation for use in flexible, modular gasification systems. The objective of the Laboratory Research Call is to solicit and competitively award research projects to develop air separation technologies to be used in advanced fossil energy-based modular energy systems that will make progress toward enabling cost-competitive, coal-based power generation with near-zero emissions. Air separation technologies developed under FWPs selected through this Laboratory Research Call would eventually find applications in coal-fed, small-scale (1-5 MWe) modular gasification-based power plants.
sCO2 power cycle (indirectly heated)
Turbines are important machines in our nation’s fleet of fossil-fueled power plants, extracting energy from domestic resources and converting it into the electricity we depend on. Turbines can also be key players in conserving resources because they can provide clean energy by using less fuel and generating fewer emissions. In a coal-fueled power plant, fuel is combusted in a large furnace to release heat energy. That energy is then used to heat a boiler that turns water into steam. The steam drives the plant’s turbine, which converts the heat energy into kinetic energy. Inside the turbine, steam flows past the turbine blades causing them to turn, like a windmill or pinwheel, except that turbines are much more sophisticated with hundreds of tightly packed blades. Steam exits the turbine and is cooled and condensed through a heat exchanger so the water can be pumped back for reuse. An axle connects the turbine to a generator that spins around with the turbine. The generator uses the kinetic energy from the turbine to make electricity, which travels out of the plant and eventually powers our businesses, homes, appliances, and more.