Reducing Uncertainties in Model Predictions Via History Matching of CO2 Migration and Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Fate at the Sleipner Project, Norwegian North Sea

 

Time-lapse seismic images of the CO<sub>2</sub> plume at<br/>Sleipner. The upper row is the north-south seismic<br/>section through the plume. The bottom row is plain<br/>views of the plume showing total integrated reflection amplitude.
Time-lapse seismic images of the CO2 plume at
Sleipner. The upper row is the north-south seismic
section through the plume. The bottom row is plain
views of the plume showing total integrated reflection amplitude.
Performer: 
Trustees of Indiana University
Website:  Indiana University
Award Number:  FE0004381
Project Duration:  10/01/2010 – 03/31/2015
Total Award Value:  $518,503.00
DOE Share:  $399,418.00
Performer Share:  $119,085.00
Technology Area:  Geologic Storage
Key Technology:  Geochemical Impacts
Location:  Bloomington, Indiana

Project Description

This project used four dimensional (4D) seismic data from the Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea to conduct multiphase flow and reactive mass transport modeling of CO2 migration in the reservoir. Researchers at Indiana University used the geologic model provided by StatOil to develop a reservoir scale multi-phase reactive flow model for CO2 plume migration and dynamic evolution of CO2 trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic/structural, solubility, mineral, and residual/capillary) at Sleipner. The reactive flow model was calibrated through history matching with progressive CO2 plume migration delineated by 4D seismic data. The calibrated reservoir model was then extrapolated to a regional scale model of multi-phase reactive mass transport to predict the fate of CO2 10,000 years after injection. A rigorous geochemical reaction kinetics framework was implemented and a number of sensitivity analysis and bounding calculations were used to aid in the reduction of uncertainty in predictions of geochemical reactions.

Project Benefits

This project is focused on using history matching and the 4D seismic reflection imaging at Sleipner in the North Sea to reduce the uncertainty in understanding the impacts of CO2 and reactive transport in saline formations. Reduction of uncertainty in reactive transport modeling allows project developers to more confidently predict storage capacity and ensure that the storage formation is being efficiently utilized. In addition, it provides confidence that the CO2 is permanently stored, thus contributing to better storage technology and reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Specifically, this project conducted multi-phase flow and reactive transport modeling of CO2 migration within the Utsira Sandstone at the Sleipner project. The model was calibrated through history matching using the progressive CO2 plume migration delineated by the 4D seismic data to predict the CO2 fate up to 10,000 years after injection into the reservoir.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Karen Kluger: Karen.kluger@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Chen Zhu: chenzhu@indiana.edu
 

Click to view Presentations, Papers, and Publications