Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation Using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies Email Page
email
Print This Page
print
Performer: Montana State University
Schematic of engineered biofilm barrier. The<br/>biofilm serves as a means to provide long-term<br/>sealing of preferential CO<sub>2</sub> leakage pathways in<br/>confining zone and surrounding injection wells.
Schematic of engineered biofilm barrier. The
biofilm serves as a means to provide long-term
sealing of preferential CO2 leakage pathways in
confining zone and surrounding injection wells.
Website: Montana State University
Award Number: FE0004478
Project Duration: 10/01/2010 – 03/31/2015
Total Award Value: $2,000,000.00
DOE Share: $1,599,997.00
Performer Share: $400,003.00
Technology Area: Geologic Storage
Key Technology: Mitigation
Location: Bozeman, Montana

Project Description

Montana State University developed a biomineralization-based technology for sealing preferential flow pathways in the vicinity of injection wells. The engineered biomineralization process produces biofilm and mineral deposits that reduce the permeability of geologic media while modifying the geochemistry of brines to enhance CO2 solubility and mineral precipitation. This process can be targeted to the geologic media surrounding carbon storage injection wells to provide long-term sealing of preferential CO2 leakage pathways. The project had three main objectives: (1) construct and test a mesoscale high pressure rock test system (HPRTS); (2) develop biomineralization seal experimental protocol; and (3) create biomineralization seals in different rock types to simulate different potential field conditions.

Project Benefits

This project focused on the study of biomineralization processes that will be effective at sealing flow or leakage pathways near wellbores in subsurface environments. Improved mitigation techniques contribute to improved storage techniques, thus reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Specifically, this project achieves its targets via an engineered biomineralization process which produces biofilm and mineral deposits that reduce the permeability of geologic media while modifying the geochemistry of brines to enhance CO2 solubility and mineral precipitation.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Joshua Hull: joshua.hull@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Lee H. Spangler: spangler@montana.edu

 

Click to view Presentations, Papers, and Publications