Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non-Destructive Borehole Logging Techniques Email Page
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Performer: Schlumberger Carbon Services
Potential CO<sub>2</sub> wellbore migration pathways: between<br/>cement and casing (Paths a and b), through the cement (c),<br/>through the casing (d), through fractures (e), and between<br/>cement and formation (f). Image is from Celia, M.A., Bachu, S., Nordbotten, J.M. Gasda, S.E. and Dahle, H.K. 2004.
Potential CO2 wellbore migration pathways: between
cement and casing (Paths a and b), through the cement (c),
through the casing (d), through fractures (e), and between
cement and formation (f). Image is from Celia, M.A., Bachu, S., Nordbotten, J.M. Gasda, S.E. and Dahle, H.K. 2004.
Website: Schlumberger Carbon Services
Award Number: FE0001040
Project Duration: 01/01/2010 – 05/31/2014
Total Award Value: $3,203,430.00
DOE Share: $2,386,625.00
Performer Share: $816,805.00
Technology Area: Monitoring, Verification, Accounting, and Assessment
Key Technology: Subsurface Monitoring
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Project Description

This project has identified leaky wellbores as an important risk to storage integrity that warrants further study to develop methods to quantify the risk of CO2 release through active and abandoned wellbores. It has developed a new method to relate the risk of release through existing wells at geologic carbon storage sites to data collected by non-destructive cement mapping tools. The data from wellbore logging tools were employed to develop models for leakage risk in wells. Methods to quantify the probability of leakage were developed for the casing, cement, cement-casing interface, cement-formation interface, and any existing defects. Models for risk of release through wells can then be developed that use collected data to establish the overall probability of leakage of a given well. Information obtained from well logging can be input into a model to evaluate the probability of leakage for specific zones in the well, e.g., the casing, cement, cement casing interface, cement-formation interface, and any existing defects.

Project Benefits

This project focused on developing a new method to evaluate the risk of CO2 release through wellbores. Reducing this risk provides greater confidence that the CO2 is permanently stored. Specifically, this project formulated correlations related to leakage risk using commercial wireline well log data to reduce containment uncertainty and further ensure CO2 storage permanence. Improved monitoring will contribute to better storage techniques thus reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Darin Damiani: darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Andrew Duguid: aduguid@slb.com

 

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