Project No: FE0008774
Performer: University of Toledo


Contacts
Robert Romanosky
Crosscutting Research Technology
Manager
National Energy Technology Laboratory
3610 Collins Ferry Road
P.O. Box 880
Morgantown, WV 26507-0880
304-285-4721
robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov

Vito Cedro
Project Manager
National Energy Technology Laboratory
626 Cochrans Mill Road
P.O. Box 10940
Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940
412-386-7406
vito.cedro@netl.doe.gov

Abdul-Majeed Azad
Principal Investigator
University of Toledo
2801 W. Bancroft Street
Toledo, OH 43606-3390
419-530-8103
abdul-majeed.azad@utoledo.edu

Duration
Award Date:  09/04/2012
Project Date:  09/03/2016

Cost
DOE Share: $300,000.00
Performer Share: $170,674.00
Total Award Value: $470,674.00

Performer website: University of Toledo - http://www.toledo.edu

Crosscutting Research - University Training and Research

Fabrication and Processing of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion

Project Description

This project combines synthesis and processing protocols to produce and characterize laboratory-scale quantities of new oxygen carrier materials. The team will perform thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), abrasion and crush strength tests, and other analytical tests to determine the physical, structural, and chemical characteristics of these materials. The project research team will conduct laboratory scale reactivity tests on the materials under typical CLC oxidizing and reducing conditions.

During Phase 1, the research team will produce five-hundred gram quantities of a matrix of substituted perovskite compositions; extrude, calcine, and crush the materials into a fluidizable size; and perform physical and chemical analyses on the calcined extrudates. During Phase 2, the materials generated will be tested for their O2 carrying ability under typical CLC conditions. These tests will be performed at 900–950 degrees Celsius (°C) in both fixed and fluidized bed lab-scale reactors. The most promising materials will then be tested for their O2 reactivity with a solid fuel such as coal or wood char. After completing the reactivity tests, the research team will perform physical and chemical analyses on the materials to determine how the materials have changed after a number of cycles at oxidation/reduction conditions typical for power generation, as well their regeneration propensity for repeated and long-term use.


Program Background and Project Benefits

The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research towards the development of efficient and inexpensive CO2 capture technologies for fossil fuel based power generation. The Department of Energy Crosscutting Research Program (CCR) serves as a bridge between basic and applied research. Projects supported by the Crosscutting Research Program conduct a range of pre-competitive research focused on opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality by research in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, and computational energy science. Within the CCR, the University Coal Research (UCR) Program sponsors research to further the understanding of coal utilization and to improve coal research capabilities and students of coal science in U.S. colleges and universities. The availability of inexpensive, functional and environmentally safe oxygen carriers is one of the main challenges in the development of chemical-looping combustion (CLC), a system for producing power from fossil fuels which allows for the efficient capture of the carbon dioxide produced during combustion.

The goal of this UCR project is to advance the basic understanding and development of promising perovskite-based oxygen carrier materials. DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with the University of Toledo to devise material processing techniques for the development and evaluation of two (2) new groups of oxygen carrier materials for potential use in CLC systems. These new oxygen carriers show promise to be more thermally and chemically stable than materials currently being considered for use as oxygen carriers in CLC systems.

This project will develop and produce new perovskite-based oxygen carriers expected to have greater thermal and chemical stability over a wide range of temperatures and oxygen partial pressures and be environmentally safer than current materials. These new oxygen carriers may contribute to the advance of chemical looping combustion as an efficient and economical approach to fossil fuel based combustion with carbon capture for better use of domestic energy resources with less negative impact on the environment.

Goal and Objectives

The goal of this project is to to determine the behavior of a new group of oxygen carriers, and advance the development of these materials for chemical looping combustion. Specific objectives in support of the project goal are (1) to produce laboratory-scale quantities of new oxygen carrier materials; (2) to process the materials into fluidizable form with proper size distribution; (3) to characterize the materials using a variety of analytical techniques to determine physical properties, chemical composition, and performance of the materials; and, (4) to determine the oxygen reactivity of the developed oxygen carriers with a solid fuel such as coal under typical oxidizing and reducing conditions for chemical looping combustion.