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Release Date: December 4, 2004

 
Fuels, Carbon Sequestration, Advanced Power Systems Form Centerpiece of DOE Research Selections
18 Coal Research Projects Chosen Under Broad-based Announcement

PITTSBURGH, PA - The Department of Energy’s commitment to fostering next-generation fuels, protecting the environment, and providing affordable and sustainable energy for the Nation was demonstrated with the recent selection of 18 projects under a broad-based solicitation for coal research. 

Scientists from industry and academia will develop new technologies through research in five areas of the coal and environmental systems program in the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Total initial funding is estimated at $2.4 million; potential funding could reach $24.7 million over the life of all the projects.  

The selected projects are described below:

Gasification—Advanced Gasification Systems 

  • The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, Calif., will demonstrate a next-generation coal gasification system utilizing advanced coal transport, injector, and gasifier hardware. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $6,250,000)

Environmental and Water Resources

  • The University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, Ky., will investigate large-volume use of slag, which can be separated into usable carbon-rich and vitreous fractions. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $341,679) 
  • Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Miss., will develop a foamed glass alternative for lightweight thermal insulators. (Project duration: 12 months; Total award value: $157,000)

Carbon Sequestration—Direct Capture Technologies

  • Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, Conn., will build on previous work in oxy-firing of a circulating fluidized bed boiler to bring technology to near-term commercial readiness. (Project duration: 12 months; Total award value: $807,790) 
  • FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, Conn., will use the unique chemistry of their Direct FuelCell to separate and capture CO2 from greenhouse gases and synergistically produce electric power with high efficiency. (Project duration: 9 months; Total award value: $165,337) 
  • Foster Wheeler North America Corp., Livingston, N.J., will improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of an oxygen-based pulverized coal power plant with high-temperature design and more efficient air separation techniques. (Project duration: 12 months; Total award value: $277,352)

Carbon Sequestration--Indirect Capture Technologies 

  • The Ohio State University Research Foundation, Columbus, Ohio, will develop and test a 13C-based protocol to evaluate the partitioning of carbon in reclaimed mine soils to accurately assess carbon sequestration in those soils. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $551,719

Carbon Sequestration—Technologies for Mitigating Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions 

  • The University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc., Lawrence, Kans., will evaluate the use of coal seams to remove greenhouse gases from landfill gases and produce higher quantities of high quality methane for energy usage. (Project duration: 24months; Total award value: $216,884)

Carbon Sequestration—Monitoring, Verification and Risk Assessment for Carbon Sequestration 

  • The University of Texas at Austin will develop guidelines for permitting CO2 sequestration projects based upon permitting practices of other programs and the results of modeling, risk assessment, and other related research and development projects. (Project duration: 18 months; Total award value: $300,154) 
  • BP Corporation North America Inc., Washington, D.C., will build on previous work in carbon storage through geologic sequestration to advance the understanding of issues in this area. (Project duration: 39 months; Total award value: $942,480) 
  • The California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., will design and build an open-path instrument for cost-effective monitoring of CO2 concentrations near ground level over large surface areas. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $207,158)

Power Systems Advanced Research—Advanced Sensors and Controls 

  • Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Miss., will develop an optical fiber chemical sensor for on-line, real-time monitoring of integrated gasification combined cycle processes. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $442,212) 
  • Sensor Research & Development Corporation of Orono, Maine, will develop a prototype sensor system to detect NO, NO2, NH3, H2S, SO2, CO, CO2, O2, and HCl directly in a high-temperature flue gas stream using semi-conducting metal oxide sensors. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $568,630)

Power Systems Advanced Research—Advanced Materials 

  • Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, Orlando, Fla., will evaluate candidate material classes and develop a technology roadmap for the most promising materials capable of supporting ultra-supercritical high-temperature steam conditions in advanced coal-fired boilers. (Project duration: 18 months; Total award value: $326,673)  

Coal Fuels and Hydrogen—Coal-derived Hydrogen 

  • The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa., will optimize hydrogen-natural gas mixture composition and utilization through laboratory studies of spark-ignition engine operation, and numerically simulate the impact of hydrogen blending on the physical and chemical processes within the engine. (Project duration: 36 months; Total award value: $845,275)
  • Kansas State University, Riley, Kans., will evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. (Project duration: 24 months; Total award value: $269,124) 
  • TIAX LLC of Cambridge, Mass., will explore the potential for fractional hydrogen supplementation as a key enabler for operating a natural-gas engine at ultra-lean conditions to produce ultra-low NOx emissions, while at the same time reducing the spark energy to increase spark plug durability and reliability. (Project duration: 12 months; Total award value: $395,937) 
  • The Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Ill., will confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine. (Project duration: 18 months; Total award value: $374,999)
 

Contact: David Anna, DOE/NETL, 412-386-4646